Historical City of Masouleh
On the foothills of Talesh Mountains in the Caspian coastal belt of northern Iran lies the historical city of Māsūleh. It is situated approximately 60 km southwest of the city of Rasht and 32 km west of Fūman in Gīlān province.

On the foothills of Talesh Mountains in the Caspian coastal belt of northern Iran lies the historical city of Māsūleh. It is situated approximately 60 km southwest of the city of Rasht and 32 km west of Fūman in Gīlān province.

The historical city of Māsūleh was established around 1006 AD, 6 km to the northwest of its current place. People moved from Old Māsūleh to the current site because of pestilence and neighbor attacks.
Masūleh River is the river passing through Māsūleh with a water fall 200m away from the city. So many other springs are found around Māsūleh. The city is also surrounded by forest from valley to mount. Fog is the  predominate weather feature.
The most exquisite feature of Māsūleh is its architecture: The buildings have been built into the mountain and are interconnected. Courtyards and roofs both serve as pedestrian areas similar to streets. Māsūleh does not allow any motor vehicles to enter, due to its unique layout. It is the only village in Iran with such a prohibition. However, the small streets and many stairs simply also wouldn't make it possible for vehicles to enter. Yellow clay coats the exterior of most buildings in Māsūleh.
Masūleh women adorn the windows with flowerpots and this gives a unique beauty to the village.
The main bazaar of Māsūleh would also be attractive to tourists: there you can see handicrafts being made by traditional artisans—Māsūleh handicrafts can be a proof of your visit to this beautiful village in evergreen land of Gīlān.
The Observance of Muharram
The mourning of muharram is an important period of mourning in Shi’a Islam, taking place in which is the first month of the Islamic calendar. Many of the events associated with the remembrance take place in congregation halls known as Hussainia.
The event marks the anniversary of the battle of Karbala when Imam Husayn ibn Ali, a grandson of Prophet Muhammad, and the third Shi’a Imam, was mrtyred by the forces of the second Ummayad caliph Yazid I. The event is marked by arranging ‘majālis’ (gatherings) to review Islamic teachings and to commemorate Husayn’s sacrifice. The mourning reaches its climax on the tenth day, known as Āshūrā, on which the forces of Yazid killed imam Hussayn, his 72 companions and members of his family. Women and children left living were enslaved and transported to Yazid’s court in Damascus